Watershed Conservation Screening Tool

Estimating how much nature can help keep your water clean

Instructions

You can add your own XY coordinates for your Surface Water Intakes using a CSV file. Simply...
1. Download this csv file
2. Open with a text editor
3. Update the lat\lon values
4. Save the file
5. Drag and drop the saved file onto the map


Watershed Conservation Report
SHAPEFILES
CLEAR
PRINT
Select Surface Water Intake
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Zoom map to desired extentPrintX
View optional parameters for each intake point
Cost per Hectare (USD):
$ $ $
$ $

Update Water Quality Report


3. Click to Create Water Quality Report
Watershed Area:

Potential for Conservation
A conservation strategy’s potential is classified based on the amount of area on which the strategy would have to be done to achieve a target pollutant reduction:
High: <1,000 ha of conservation action needed
Medium: 1,000 – 10,000 ha of conservation action needed
Low: > 10,000 ha of conservation action needed.
Unlikely: Not possible to hit the pollutant reduction target using this conservation strategy
High
Medium
Low
Unlikely
Sed
P
Sed
P
Sed
P
Sed
P
Sed
Agriculture
BMPs
Riparian
Buffers
Forest
Protection
Grassland
Reforestation
Forest Fuel
Reduction
View the potential for conservation to achieve
a sediment or phosphorus reduction of:
1%
5%
10%
20%

Land Cover
- % Wetland
- % Forest
- % Grassland
- % Barren
- % Cropland
- % Developed

Pollutant Loading



Legend showing red as high sediment loading as red and low as green Legend showing red as high phosphorus loading as red and low as green

Agriculture Best Management Practices
SedimentPhosphorus
AreaCost (USD)AreaCost (USD)





Riparian Buffers
SedimentPhosphorus
AreaCost (USD)AreaCost (USD)





Forest Protection
SedimentPhosphorus
AreaCost (USD)AreaCost (USD)





Grassland Reforestation
SedimentPhosphorus
AreaCost (USD)AreaCost (USD)





Forest Fuel Reduction
Sediment
AreaCost (USD)




Watershed Conservation Screening Tool

What it does: This tool will quickly measure the potential for five common watershed conservation activities to reduce sediment and nutrient pollution in a source watershed.

Values returned: This tool will describe for each source watershed its land cover and estimate its pollutant loading. It will also return for each watershed the amount of conservation effort (in area or cost) needed to achieve a 1%, 5%, 10%, and 20% reduction in pollution.

Surface water only: This tool is intended for bulk surface water users that know the location of their water intakes. Groundwater sustainability is not analyzed.

Non-point source pollution only: This tool focuses on how watershed conservation activity can reduce sediment and nutrient pollution from non-point sources. Watersheds that have significant sources of pollution from point sources may not find the results returned meaningful.

Municipal water users: Water users that draw water from a municipal supply must know where that municipal water supply comes from. Users can look up this information for some large cities in the Urban Water Blueprint. If your city isn’t listed there, but you know where you city gets its water from, then you can should enter that information yourself.

Inter-basin transfers: If a larger inter-basin transfer of water into your watershed occurs upstream of your water intake, you must input into the tool both the location of your intake and the location of where the transferred water comes from (the donor basin).

More info: If this is your first time using the Screening Tool, please watch our short briefing video about the tool here. Next, watch our video walkthrough of how to use the tool here. If you want more details on the methodology of the app, please click here.

This tool was developed by staff at The Nature Conservancy, in collaboration with staff at the Natural Capital project. It is part of the research conducted by the Urban Water Security Working Group supported by SNAP: Science for Nature and People, a partnership of The Nature Conservancy, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS).

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